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NASA Images
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Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are known as the jovian (Jupiter-like) planets because they are all gigantic compared with Earth, and they have a gaseous nature like Jupiter's. The jovian planets are also referred to as the gas giants, although some or all of them might have small solid cores. This diagram shows the approximate relative sizes of the jovian planets. *Image Credit*: Lunar and Planetary Institute
Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Jupiter, What -- Saturn, What...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=180
NASA Images
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*Jupiter* Jupiter's composition is mainly hydrogen and helium. In contrast to planetary bodies covered with a hard surface crust (the Earth, for example), the jovian surface is gaseous-liquid, rendering the boundary between the atmosphere and the planet itself almost indistinguishable. Below the roughly 1000-kilometer-thick atmosphere, a layer of liquid hydrogen extends to a depth of 20,000 kilometers. Even deeper, it is believed that there is a layer of liquid metallic hydrogen at a pressure...
Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Earth, What -- Jupiter, What...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=166
NASA Images
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*Mercury* Mercury has an average density of 5430 kilograms per cubic meter, which is second only to Earth among all the planets. It is estimated that the planet Mercury, like Earth, has a ferrous core with a size equivalent to two-thirds to three-fourths that of the planet's overall radius. The core is believed to be composed of an iron-nickel alloy covered by a mantle and surface crust. *Venus* It is believed that the composition of the planet Venus is similar to that of Earth. The planet...
Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Mercury, What -- Earth, What...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=168
NASA Images
by NASA
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The terrestrial planets are the four innermost planets in the solar system; Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. They are called terrestrial because they have a compact, rocky surface like the Earth's. The planets Venus, Earth, and Mars have significant atmospheres, while Mercury has almost none. This diagram shows the approximate relative sizes of the terrestrial planets. Distances are not to scale. *Image Credit*: Lunar and Planetary Institute
Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Mercury, What -- Venus, What...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=179
NASA Images
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Galaxies, galaxies everywhere - as far as NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can see. This view of nearly 10,000 galaxies is the deepest visible-light image of the cosmos. Called the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, this galaxy-studded view represents a "deep" core sample of the universe, cutting across billions of light-years. The snapshot includes galaxies of various ages, sizes, shapes, and colors. The smallest, reddest galaxies, about 100, may be among the most distant known, existing when the...
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Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST),...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=1463
NASA Images
by NASA
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A selection of our solar system's natural satellites are shown here to scale compared to the Earth and its moon. *Image Credit*: NASA
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Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Earth, What -- Moon
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=2823
Solar System Collection
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Schematic illustration of the invisible magnetic field lines generated by the Earth, represented as a dipole magnet field. In actuality, our magnetic shield is squeezed in closer to Earth on the Sun-facing side and extremely elongated on the night-side due to the solar wind. Earth's polarity is not a constant. Unlike a classic bar magnet, the matter governing Earth's magnetic field moves around. Geophysicists are pretty sure that the reason Earth has a magnetic field is because its solid iron...
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/gallery/Earths-magneticfieldlines-dipole.html
NASA Images
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During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft took these images on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. The dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins: Oceanus Procellarum (on the left), Mare Imbrium (center left), Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis (center), and Mare Crisium (near the right edge). This picture contains...
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Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Galileo, What -- Moon, What...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=2094